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Tipping Etiquette Worldwide: Your Guide to Gratuity Customs

Tipping Etiquette in Various Countries: What You Need to Know

When traveling abroad, it’s important to know the customs and etiquette of the country you are visiting. One of the customs that can vary widely between countries is tipping.

To help you navigate the tipping culture in various countries, we’ve put together a guide to tipping etiquette in different parts of the world.

Tipping in Australia

In Australia, it’s not customary to tip hotel staff or restaurant servers. In fact, tipping is generally not expected in any service industry.

If you receive exceptional service, it’s okay to leave a small tip, but it’s not necessary. In transportation services, it’s common to offer the change as a tip.

Tipping in Austria

In Austria, it’s customary to tip hotel staff about 1 euro per day for valet or housekeeping services. In restaurants, it’s common to tip about 10% of the total bill or round up to a convenient amount.

For transportation services, it’s also customary to tip about 10%.

Tipping in Brazil

In Brazil, tipping is expected in hotels and restaurants. For hotel services, it’s customary to tip the housekeeper daily, about 5 to 10 Brazilian reals, and the porter about 1 real per bag.

If you receive exceptional service from the concierge, it’s appropriate to tip 10 to 15 reals. In restaurants, it’s customary to tip about 15% of the total bill.

For transportation services, it’s customary to tip 10% for longer trips or round up for shorter ones.

Tipping in Canada

In Canada, tipping is expected in the service industry. For hotel services, it’s common to tip about $1 to $15 Canadian for bellhops, concierge, and valet services.

In restaurants, it’s customary to tip at least 15% of the total bill. For transportation services, it’s common to tip up to 10% of the fare.

Tipping in Chile

In Chile, it’s customary to tip hotel staff about 1 to 15 Chilean pesos depending on the service received. In restaurants, it’s customary to tip about 10% to 15% of the total bill.

For transportation services, it’s customary to tip about 10% or round up to the nearest whole number.

Tipping in China

In China, it’s not customary to tip in the service industry. This includes hotels, restaurants, and transportation services.

As a general rule, it’s okay to offer a small gift as a token of appreciation, but tipping monetary amounts is not expected.

Tipping in Costa Rica

In Costa Rica, it’s customary to tip porters about $1 per bag and housekeeping about $2 per day. Tipping beyond this is not expected, but if you receive exceptional service, it’s okay to offer a little extra.

Conclusion

Understanding tipping customs in different countries is an important part of being a responsible traveler. By following these guidelines, you can ensure that you’re showing respect to the local culture while still acknowledging good service.

Remember, tipping is not always necessary or expected, but it’s a great way to show appreciation for a job well done. Tipping etiquette can vary greatly across different countries.

While tipping is expected in some countries, it is not customary in others. It is important to understand the customs and practices of the country you are visiting to avoid offending anyone or being taken advantage of.

Some countries have specific customs and tipping amounts for hotel staff, restaurant servers, and transportation services. Remember to always show respect to the local culture and acknowledge exceptional service.

Knowing tipping etiquette is an important part of being a responsible traveler, and can lead to a more enjoyable and memorable trip.

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